Aspen-bound travelers often focus on the wealth of hiking and skiing possibilities available, but this charming Colorado town also offers plenty of museums for those who want a more cultural experience. Here are three museums that are well worth a visit next time you’re in Aspen


Aspen Art Museum

Designed by world-renowned architect Shigeru Ban, the Aspen Art Museum displays contemporary art from emerging artists around the globe as well as solo exhibitions from established contemporary artists that focus on underappreciated aspects of their artistic output. The museum also highlights group exhibitions curated to address relevant political, social, or cultural issues. Current artists on display include Simone Forti, Oscar Murillo, Rashid Johnson, and Bruce Nauman. In addition to art displays, the museum hosts educational programs and community events that focus on the intersection of art, culture, and society. The museum is open for tours Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is free.


Holden Marolt Mining & Ranching Museum

Managed by the Aspen Historical Society, this museum serves as an homage to Aspen’s ranching and mining industries. Several buildings from the 1890s are still intact, including a miner’s cabin that was transformed into a Victorian home and an outhouse. A barn that dates back to the mining era has been transformed into an interactive museum with artifacts and displays, while the historic Zupancis homestead was recently moved to the property by the City of Aspen. The museum is located near a public bike trail, making it the perfect launching pad for a family-friendly outing. Admission is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors, while children under 18 can get in for free when accompanied by an adult. 


Wheeler/Stallard Museum

Built in the late 1880s, the Wheeler/Stallard house is a Queen Anne-style Victorian that Aspen local Jerome B. Wheeler built for his family. His wife Harriet Macy Valentine Wheeler refused to leave their residence in Manitou Springs, however, so the family never actually set up residence in the Victorian. In 1905, a couple by the name of Edgar and Mary Ella Stallard purchased the home and lived there for four decades. Taking up an entire city block, the home was one of the most regal properties in the city when it was first built. Today, the first floor serves as a recreation of a Victorian home and the second floor features a rotating gallery exhibition. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors, while children under 18 are free with an adult. 


If you’re thinking of moving to Aspen, contact Carrie Wells of Elite Aspen Real Estate today. She can answer any questions you have about the Aspen real estate market and help you find a home that crosses off every item on your checklist.